Monday, August 2, 2010


"Honey has been used for centuries as a popular ‘home remedy’ for wounds and ulcers. Recent research has shown that it has antibacterial properties, as well as anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties.

Honey has been known for its healing properties for thousands of years - the Ancient Greeks used it, and so have many other peoples through the ages. Even up to the second world war, honey was being used for its antibacterial properties in treating wounds. But with the advent of penicillin and other antibiotic drugs in the twentieth century, honey's medicinal qualities have taken a back seat. But that might be about to change - thanks to one New Zealand based researcher.
Peter Molan, Ph.D., likes to tell the story of the 20-year-old wound. Infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, an abscess oozed in an English woman's armpit long after it had been drained. Nothing seemed to help, and the pain prevented her from working. Then in August of 1999, she read about the remarkable wound-healing properties of honey. She convinced doctors to apply some to the dressing to her arm, and a month later the wound healed. Now she's back at work.
Treatment with honey is called apitherapy,which includes replenishing energy, enhancing physical stamina and improving immune systems. Honey also is considered to have a calming effect on the mind and promotes sleep. Honey also helps indigestion and has sometimes been used to treat cardiovascular disease and respiratory complaints. A thin coat of honey can be applied on the skin to disinfect and heal minor skin wounds and chapped lips.

Australian researchers have revealed the secret explanation for the deadly bug-killing properties of honey. Researcher, Shona Blair from the University of Sydney has found that, when diluted honey is applied to a moist wound, it produces hydrogen peroxide, a known anti-bacterial agent. The research has also revealed that honey is powerful even against drug-resistant hospital killer golden staph Staphylococcus aureus.

Honey consumption may have a positive effect on factors associated with heart disease risk. Specifically, honey appears to lower C-reactive protein and may have a lesser impact on blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels compared to glucose or a honey analogue particularly in diabetic and/or hyperlipidemic subjects.

Although honey's healing benefits were known to Muslims more than a thousand years ago, scientists are just now beginning to research it's amazing powers. Indeed, Peter Molan, biochemist at the University of Waikato (New Zealand) has - for the past 17 years - researched into the healing properties of honey and has shown scientifically that all honeys have varying degrees of such properties (Molan, p.1). Honey contains many minerals and vitamins beneficial to man. However, one of the most important properties seems to be its antibiotic action.

Deterioration of purpuric skin lesions into necrotic areas is increased by oedema; honey is known to reduce oedema, therefore, it may be particularly advantageous to apply honey at an early stage in the development of meningococcal skin lesions. Additionally, reports of honey being effective in the treatment of gangrene suggest a role in reducing the number of amputations in meningococcal septicaemia. The disfigurement that results from meningococcal skin lesions may also be reduced by the use of honey at an early stage; when used on burns honey reduces the amount of scarring.

Amid growing concern over drug-resistant superbugs and nonhealing wounds that endanger diabetes patients, nature's original antibiotic — honey — is making a comeback.

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